Fight against Westbourne homes rages on

C131139-1 Chi Westbourne Housing  phot kate''Ian Cross, Westbourne resident and committee member of the neighbourhood plan, by the site of the proposed development where a scaffolding replica of the scale of one of the buildings has been erected.Picture by Kate Shemilt,C131139-1 ENGSUS00120130816163507
C131139-1 Chi Westbourne Housing phot kate''Ian Cross, Westbourne resident and committee member of the neighbourhood plan, by the site of the proposed development where a scaffolding replica of the scale of one of the buildings has been erected.Picture by Kate Shemilt,C131139-1 ENGSUS00120130816163507

LETTERS have flooded into the Observer to object to a 16-home plan in Westbourne.

The plans by Southcott Homes for Long Copse Meadow is set to be determined by Chichester District Council in October, and has been recommended for approval by officers.

However, objectors have voiced their concerns, as an application for 22 homes on the same site was dismissed by a planning inspector in December. Residents said the new 16-home plan was no different.

Residents Ken and Elizabeth Strowlger, said: “If developers who have been refused permission after an inquiry are allowed to reapply so quickly, the whole system of appeals and judgements is abused.”

Another resident, Susan Pike, said: “After such a clear reason from the planning inspector stating building should NOT take place on this site, how can Chichester District Council even consider allowing this development to take place. And how ever much is this silly affair costing us?”

David and Susan Todd, from School Lane, said: “How can the officers come to reverse this decision and go against the inspectors?”

Jesse Grant, of Long Copse Lane, said it was ‘a total waste of taxpayers’ money’ to determine the application again.

“The inspector’s findings were the environmental harm of the development would outweigh the benefits, and would be in conflict with Westbourne village design statement. Please don’t fast-track sites that are not suitable and are against the public opinion.”

For the 22-home plan, residents put up scaffolding on the site to show the impact of development there.

And the new plans have seen more than 120 objections, showing residents are not giving up the fight.