Pupils get top cricket tips from Sussex and England batsman

Sussex opening batsman, Chris Nash, with Jack Crossley-West, ten, from Barnham Primary school during a coaching session with pupils
Sussex opening batsman, Chris Nash, with Jack Crossley-West, ten, from Barnham Primary school during a coaching session with pupils

Sussex and England Lions cricketer Chris Nash went back to school to teach pupils the importance of good sportsmanship.

Nash took part in an Spirit of Cricket assembly at Barnham Primary School as part of the MCC’s scheme to teach children to play hard but fair.

It was an interactive assembly with around 100 pupils about the importance of respecting team-mates, the opposition and officials.

After youngsters watched a DVD the hall was split into teams and several pupils took part in a bowl-off. The children immediately put what they had just learned into practice, shaking hands after they finished.

Pupils also enjoyed a cricket coaching session with Nash. They practised a range of drills to improve batting skills, increase fitness and make cricket fun.

Nash said: “The kids had a great afternoon. They learned about teamwork, respect, sportsmanship and how to treat other people whether you’re winning or losing. They’re all valuable lessons they can take into life away from the cricket field.”

The Sussex star praised the Chance to Shine campaign, delivered here through the Sussex Cricket Board, that aims to bring cricket and its educational opportunities to two million children in state schools.

“The number of kids playing cricket is unbelievable. It’s something I didn’t have as a youngster and it’s invaluable to get as many kids into cricket as possible.”

Year 5 pupil Dylan said: “We did lots of fun activities. It was great meeting a professional cricket player and he was really interesting. I learned a lot and improved my catching and throwing.”

Year 5 teacher Joel Lane said: “It’s been fantastic to see Chris come in and it’s been really inspiring for the children and very informative.

“The kids have learned to be sporting even if things aren’t going their way, how to be part of a team and support their team-mates even if they haven’t done as well as they’d like.”