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GOODWOOD REVIVAL: All aboard for a nostaligic ride

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Thousands flocked to Goodwood Revival, the world’s most popular historic motor race meeting, to relive the glory days of Goodwood motor circuit and enter the nostalgic time capsule of the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s.

For three days between Friday and Sunday, September 14-16, Goodwood opened its gates to a fantastic array of racing cars and motorcycles which would have competed at Goodwood between 1948-1966.

Historic aircraft took to the skies to perform incredible aerobatics against the impressive backdrop of the downland setting, and spectators clad in the most inventive and authentic period dress perused the Revival high street, reclined in deck chairs and showed off their fox furs, frocks, pearls, tweeds and trilbies.

Sir Stirling Moss, former racing driver, said: “Goodwood certainly has been, all my life, one of my favourite places to come to because the atmosphere here is something any other races in the world would like to attain.”

Among the highlights of this year’s racing line-up was the Shelby Cup, which celebrated the 50th anniversary of the AC Cobra, and paid tribute to its Texan creator Carroll Shelby, who passed away earlier in the year.

The iconic and devilishly dominant German-made Silver Arrows also made a loud and dramatic return to the track, marking 75 years since their first Goodwood debut and evoking one of the greatest ages of Grand Prix racing. Racing on Sunday finished with the Sussex Trophy, won by Julian Majzub.

Jochen Mass, former racing driver, said: “It is much more about racing from the heart compared to what we have in the modern era. It’s not just the racing at Goodwood, it is everything else, something that touches your very soul.”

The roar of wartime aircraft overhead tore all eyes away from the circuit to the skies with the likes of the Sea Fury T20 fighter and the British Hawker Hurricane, one of the most effective fighter planes of the second world war.

Goodwood Revival is renowned for its marvellous people-watching opportunities, and this year the largest period fancy dress party didn’t disappoint. The outfits were stunning as always, and many revellers had even gone to the great lengths to make their own.

Paul and Angelique Thompson, who own a vintage hotel in Cornwall, said: “It’s our first time here and we are absolutely loving it, the atmosphere, the circuit racing, the planes and most of all the people-watching. We are definitely coming back next year!”

The period Tesco store on the Revival high street was always teaming with keen shoppers who wanted to stock up on their 50s and 60s essentials, such as Marathon chocolate bars, Double Diamond Ale and the obligatory can of spam.

As for the cars, Maserati, Ford, BMW, Jaguar and Mercedes were among those displaying new models alongside those from their heritage collections.

The Revival market was bigger and better than ever this year, with around 400 stalls of vintage-inspired brands including Browne and Daughters, Biba, What Katie Did and Goodwood’s own clothing range. The market also extended into the over-the-road area where vintage enthusiasts enjoyed a victory street party and the Chap Olympiad, which hosted tweed-clad men jousting with umbrellas.

For those who never wanted to leave the time capsule of Revival, the over-the-road area stayed open into the evening so people could carry on the post-war party.

Lord March said: “This was 
the busiest and most successful Revival yet. After 20 years of trying to get the Silver Arrows racers together, this was a real coup for 
us, and I was especially excited 
and delighted to have Dan Gurney with us here in person, so that we could pay a fitting tribute to the all-time-great racing drivers. It was a great weekend.”

 

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