Arundel school walk will help family in India build a secure home

Pupils and staff at Arundel CE Primary School held a sponsored walk to raise money for a charity supporting families in India.

More than 200 people took part, walking at least a mile last Wednesday for FEAST (For Education and Social Transformation), an aid project in Tamil Nadu.

Father Jeremias George talking to pupils at Arundel CE Primary School about the work of FEAST (For Education and Social Transformation)

Father Jeremias George talking to pupils at Arundel CE Primary School about the work of FEAST (For Education and Social Transformation)

Andrew Simpson, head teacher, said: “In a year that has seen an unprecedented level of public discussion around equality in the developed and developing world, pupils and staff at Arundel Church of England Primary School, in partnership with St Nicholas’ Church, reflected on the situation of people and especially children in impoverished regions, who are often denied a right to education, and they decided to do something about it.”

The school has a close relationship with the church and they work in partnership to support FEAST, which was founded by Father Jeremias George.

The charity seeks to help the poorest in society and transform the lives of children by supporting their education. It has been running as a trust since 1998 and to date has helped more than 20,000 people.

Heidi Simpson, deputy head teacher, said: “We’re so proud to support such a worthy cause. The sense of community was evident as a line of children and staff snaked up around the school grounds and the long walk gave our pupils a chance to reflect on the lives of those less fortunate and the importance of raising our voices to speak for those facing less favourable conditions across the globe.”

The walk has so far raised more than £700 and donations are still streaming into the school.

It is hoped enough money will be raised to pay for a house for a family in India.

Build a House is one part of FEAST’s work, helping the many families who live in primitive palm leaf shelters that leak when it rains.

Poverty, unemployment, diminished fishing catches and the destruction wrought by the 2004 tsunami have all played their part in forcing many families to live in makeshift homes without even basic amenities.

With a donation of £1800, a simple two-roomed house can become a secure home. Visit feastindia.org.uk for more information.